Past Impact

In December of 2015, at the Paris climate talks, Corporate Accountability International delivered the following message to the United Nations Secretariat, with over 570,000 signatures.

To the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC):

“We call on you to take immediate action to protect COP22 and all future negotiations from the influence of big polluters. Given the fossil fuel industry’s years of interference intended to block progress, push false solutions, and continue the disastrous status quo, the time has come to stop treating big polluters as legitimate ‘stakeholders’ and to remove them from climate policymaking.”

Today, we are facing the prospect of the destruction of life as we know it and irreversible damage to our planet due to climate change. Scientists are telling us with ever more urgency that we must act quickly to stop extracting fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But the world’s largest polluters have prevented progress on bold climate action for far too long.

We call on the Parties to the UNFCCC to protect the U.N. climate talks and climate policymaking around the world from the influence of big polluters. The world is looking to these international negotiations for decisive action on climate. This is a pivotal moment to create real solutions and ensure leaders are taking increasingly bold action to address the climate crisis.

But the fossil fuel industry and other transnational corporations that have a vested interest in stopping progress continue to delay, weaken, and block climate policy at every level. From the World Coal Association hosting a summit on “clean coal” around COP19 to Shell aggressively lobbying in the European Union for weak renewable energy goals while promoting gas, these big polluters are peddling false solutions to protect their profits while driving the climate crisis closer to the brink.

A decade ago, the international community took on another behemoth industry — Big Tobacco — and created a precedent-setting treaty mechanism that removed the tobacco industry from public health policy. This can happen again here.